Tag archive for public sector unions

States ponder athletes as government employees

A few weeks ago I wrote about the opportunity that a recent NLRB ruling allowing student athletes at Northwestern to organize might create for public sector organizing. Now states are moving in different directions with regard to allowing unionizing of student athletes at public universities…

Griping about taxes is high where unions are strongest

Gallup has a new state poll out listing where residents gripe the most about taxes. The winners (if you can call them that) are largely not surprising, if you 480x480xno-taxes.gif.pagespeed.ic.FajJWeTt5lfollow policy debates these days. (Except for Nebraska. What are those folks so upset about?) Just for fun (if you can call it that) I took a look at how the list of those complaining the most about taxes correlated to the degree of government unionization in each state…

Public sector unions = higher debt

States with more heavily unionized public-sector workforces are more likely to have higher total debt, according to this new study from the Beacon Hill Institute in Boston. Specifically, the study finds that each percentage point increase in public sector unionization equates to an added $78 …

Calvin Coolidge’s secret strategy to fight union pressure was to say “no”

For a dominant political figure, Calvin Coolidge was an unusual type: taciturn, frugal, and almost unbelievably wonky.
The budget idea, I may admit, is a sort of obsession with me. I believe in budgets. I want other people to believe in them. I have had a …

Illinois union “bulletin” maps out path to state employee strike

The Herald and Review has managed to get ahold of a new bulletin from the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, or AFSCME, to its members. This new message indicates that the union is getting closer to calling for a strike, and gives the union’s rationale for a walkout, revealing some very useful facts on the state of bargaining

Three bites of an apple leaves taxpayers holding a rotten core

Much has been said in recent months about the growing power of public sector unions in American government and their coercive effect on sustainable fiscal management, but nowhere in the nation is the power of public sector unions more destructive and unrivaled than in California. …

The union steamroller in California

If you haven’t read it yet, I recommend that anyone with an interest in California government (and the roots of its dysfunction) sit down with Daniel DiSalvo’s new report on the power that big labor exerts on Golden State politics. The whole thing is worth a …

Will Californians support paycheck protection? It will come down to the Wire

One of the biggest initiatives on the fall ballot in California is Proposition 32, which aims to succeed where previous initiatives have failed: in protecting California workers from having their union dues spent for political purposes without their consent.Given the tremendous influence of big labor in the Golden State, the effort is both (a) a necessary precondition of serious reform and (b) a very heavy lift politically.Its prospects? According to a new poll from the Public Policy Institute of California, it will go right down to the wire. 

The public-private union gap: does it weaken or strengthen public sector unions?

The private sector makes up 80% of all American employment. 40.7% of the public sector workforce is covered by union representation, in contrast to only 7.6% of the private sector. Thus, to the extent that union-represented public employees enjoy compensation packages and working conditions unavailable to most of the general public, public employee unions will become less sympathetic. Recent results in Wisconsin, San Diego, and San Jose confirm this lack of sympathy.

How pension accounting affects public-private pay comparisons

One of the contributions that Andrew Biggs and I have tried to make to the debate over public- versus private-sector compensation is to point out that pension accounting has a major effect on the comparison.